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Aircraft continuing airworthiness record system

M.A.305

M.A.305(a) Certificate of release to service

(a) At the completion of any maintenance, aircraft certificate of release to service (‘CRS’) required by point M.A.801 or point 145.A.50, as applicable, shall be entered in the aircraft continuing airworthiness record system, as soon as practicable and no later than 30 days after the completion of any maintenance.

AMC M.A.305(a) Maintenance certification

(a) The inclusion of the certificate of release to service in the aircraft continuing airworthiness record system means that the date and/or any applicable parameter at which the maintenance was performed, including a unique reference to the certificate of release to service, should be processed in the record system.

(b) For components with airworthiness limitations, this information should be found on the authorised release certificate (EASA Form 1 or equivalent). For life-limited parts, some relevant information required by M.A.305 may need to be introduced in the in-service history records.

M.A.305(b) Continuing airworthiness records contents

(b) The aircraft continuing airworthiness record system shall contain the following:

1. the date of the entry, the total in-service life accumulated in the applicable parameter for aircraft, engine(s) and/or propeller(s);

2. the aircraft continuing airworthiness records described in points (c) and (d) below together with the supporting detailed maintenance records described in point (e) below;

3. if required by point M.A.306, the aircraft technical log.

AMC M.A.305(b)(1) In-service life for engines, propellers and APU’s

(a) Some gas turbine engines and propellers are assembled from modules and the total life accumulated in service for the complete engine or propeller may not be kept. When owners and operators wish to take advantage of the modular design, then the total life accumulated in service for each module, as well as in-service history if applicable, and detailed maintenance records for each module, should be maintained. The continuing airworthiness records as specified should be kept with the module and should show compliance with any mandatory requirements pertaining to that module.

(b) The recording of in-service life accumulation may be necessary also in other measurement units to ensure the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft. For example, a mandatory life limitation measured in cycles of auxiliary power unit (APU) usage may apply to some rotating parts. In such a case, APU cycles need to be recorded.

M.A.305(c) Mass and balance report, statuses

(c) The aircraft continuing airworthiness records shall include the current mass and balance report and the current status of:

1. ADs and measures mandated by the competent authority in immediate reaction to a safety problem;
2. modifications and repairs;
3. compliance with the AMP;
4. deferred maintenance tasks and deferred defects rectification.

AMC M.A.305(c)1 Airworthiness directives

(a) The current status of ADs, and measures mandated by the competent authority in immediate reaction to a safety problem, should identify the product/component, the applicable ADs including revision or amendment numbers and the date on which the status was updated. For the purpose of assessing the AD status, there is no need to list those ADs which are superseded or cancelled.

(b) If the AD is generally applicable to the aircraft or component type but is not applicable to the particular aircraft, engine, propeller or component, then this should be identified with the reason why it is not applicable.

(c) The current status of ADs should include the release to service date on which the AD or measure was accomplished (the date the certificate of release to service was issued), and where the AD or measure is controlled by flight hours and/or flight cycles and/or landings and/or any other applicable parameter, as appropriate, it should include the corresponding total life on that parameter accumulated in service on the date when the AD or measure was accomplished and/or the due limit in the appropriate parameter. For repetitive ADs or measures, only the last and next applications with the reference to the applicable parameter should be recorded in the current status.

(d) The status should also specify the method of compliance and which part of a multi-part AD or measure has been accomplished, where a choice is available in the AD or measure.

(e) The current status of AD should be sufficiently detailed to identify any loadable software aircraft part which is used for operating or controlling the aircraft.

(f) When the AD is multi-part or requests assessments of certain inspections, this information should be shown as well.

AMC M.A.305(c)2 Modifications and repairs

(a) Status of current modifications and repairs means a list compiled at aircraft level of modifications and repairs currently embodied. It should include the identification of the aircraft, engine(s) or propeller(s), as appropriate, and the date of the certificate of release to service when the modification or repair was accomplished. Where a modification or repair creates the need for the accomplishment of scheduled maintenance tasks, the reference to the applicable tasks should be added to the aircraft maintenance programme. The status should include the reference to the data in accordance with M.A.304 that provides the accomplishment procedure for the modification or repair. It should also specify which part of a multi-part modification or repair has been accomplished and the method of compliance, where a choice is available in the data.

(b) In addition to the previous applicable information, in respect to structure, the status of the current repairs should contain the description of the repair (e.g. doubler, blend, crack, dent, etc.), its location (e.g. reference to stringers, frames, etc.) and the dimensions. In the case of blend-out repairs, the remaining material should be recorded too.


(c) The status of modifications should be sufficiently detailed to identify any installed loadable software aircraft part used for operating or controlling the aircraft, the part number of which evolves independently of its associated aircraft hardware component, as identified in the maintenance data of the relevant design approval holders.
Other loadable software parts, such as navigational data bases or entertainment systems, are not considered under this recording requirement.


(d) For the purpose of this paragraph, a component replaced by a fully interchangeable alternate component is not considered a modification if this condition is published by the design approval holder.


(e) The status of modifications and repairs should include engine(s), propeller(s) and components subject to mandatory instructions and associated airworthiness limitations, and it is not intended that it should be retained for other components.

GM M.A.305(c)(2) Impact of modifications and repairs

(a) The status of modifications and repairs may include the impact of a specific modification or repair in:

(1) embodiment instructions;
(2) mass and balance change data;
(3) maintenance and repair manual supplements;
(4) maintenance programme changes and instructions for continuing airworthiness; and/or
(5) aircraft flight manual supplements.

(b) When aircraft require a specific loadable software aircraft part configuration in order to operate correctly, a specific listing with this information may be necessary too.

AMC M.A.305(c)3 Aircraft maintenance programme

(a) The current status of compliance with the aircraft maintenance programme means the last and next accomplishment data (referring to the applicable parameter) for the tasks specified in the maintenance schedule of the aircraft maintenance programme. It should include:

(1) an identifier specific enough to allow an easy and accurate identification of the task to be carried out, such as a task reference combined with a task title or short description of the work to be performed;
(2) the engine, propeller or component identification when the task is controlled at engine, propeller, or component level; and
(3) the date when the task was accomplished (i.e. the date the certificate of release to service was issued) and for repetitive tasks when it is next due time, as well as when the terminating action is performed.


(b) Where the task is controlled by flight hours and/or flight cycles and/or landings and/or calendar time and/or any other applicable parameter, the total in-service life accumulated by the aircraft, engine, propeller or component (as appropriate) in the suitable parameter(s) should also be included.

M.A.305(d) Components status

(d) The aircraft continuing airworthiness records shall include the current status specific to components of:

1. life-limited parts, including the life accumulated by each affected part in relation to the applicable airworthiness limitation parameter; and

2. time-controlled components, including the life accumulated by the affected components in the applicable parameter, since the last accomplishment of scheduled maintenance, as specified in the AMP.

GM M.A.305(d) Life-limited parts and time-controlled components

(a) A part is to be considered a life-limited part and a time-controlled component when it complies with both definitions given in paragraphs (c) and (e) of GM M.A.305. For example, the maintenance schedule of the aircraft maintenance programme may include both a mandatory permanent removal for a landing gear sliding tube and a periodic removal for overhaul of the landing gear (including the sliding tube).

(b) The following table provides a summary of the records’ requirements related to life-limited parts and time-controlled components:

Maintenance task from the maintenance schedule of the AMPType of componentContinuing airworthiness records
Permanent removal (replacement)Life-limited part e.g.: engine HPT disc, landing gear sliding tube— Current status (M.A.305(d)(1));
— In-service history record (M.A.305(e)(3)(i)); — EASA Form 1 and detailed maintenance records for last scheduled maintenance and subsequent unscheduled maintenance (M.A.305(e)(3)(ii));
— EASA Form 1 and detailed maintenance records for modifications and repairs (M.A.305(e)(2)(ii))
Periodic removal for maintenance in an appropriate approved workshop (overhaul of horizontal stabilizer actuator or of a landing gear | replacement of a U-joint of a gearbox)Time-controlled component e.g.: horizontal stabiliser actuator, landing gear gearbox— Current status (M.A.305(d)(2));
— EASA Form 1 and detailed maintenance records for last scheduled maintenance and subsequent unscheduled maintenance (M.A.305(e)(3)(ii)); and
— EASA Form 1 and detailed maintenance records for modifications and repairs (M.A.305(e)(2)(ii)).

GM M.A.305(d)(2) Tasks controlled at component level

(a) The maintenance schedule of the aircraft maintenance programme may include tasks controlled at component level coming from a mandatory requirement in accordance with Part 21 and to be performed in a workshop, such as:

(1) the removal of a component for periodic restoration to return the component to a specified standard (e.g. removal of the landing gear for overhaul);
(2) the periodic removal of a component for replacement of a sub-component by a new one when it is not possible to restore the item to a specific standard of failure resistance (e.g. discarding of universal joints of a gearbox, batteries of the escape slide/raft, discharge cartridges of fire extinguishers, etc.); and
(3) a periodic inspection or test to confirm that a component meets specified performance standards (e.g. functional check of the portable emergency locator transmitter, etc.). The component is left in service (no further maintenance action taken) on the condition that it continues to fulfil its intended purpose within specified performance limits until the next scheduled inspection.


The above tasks apply to ‘time-controlled components’ as defined in paragraph (e) of GM M.A.305. If a component affected by a task in accordance with (2) and (3) above is controlled at aircraft level by the aircraft maintenance programme and it has not been removed since the task was last accomplished, then its status of compliance with M.A.305(d)2 is already demonstrated by the aircraft records.
Note: The maintenance in accordance:
— with (1) and (2) above assumes a predictable deterioration of the component: the overall reliability invariably decreases with age; and
— with (3) assumes a gradual deterioration of the component: failure resistance can reduce and drop below a defined level.


(b) When a component is affected by a maintenance task contained the aircraft maintenance programme (AMP) that is recommended by the design approval holder (DAH) and controlled at component level, although such component does not qualify as a time-controlled component, the status of the component may be needed to show that all the maintenance due on the aircraft according to the aircraft maintenance programme has been carried out. There is no a specific requirement to keep the EASA Form 1 or equivalent or any other detailed maintenance records.


(c) For aircraft maintenance programmes developed under a primary maintenance process-oriented methodology (e.g. Maintenance Steering Group), the term ‘time-controlled component’ pertains to ‘Hard Time’ and ‘On-Condition’. The primary maintenance processes are:


(1) Hard Time
This is a preventive process in which known deterioration of a component is limited to an acceptable level by the maintenance actions which are carried out at periods related to time in service (e.g. calendar time, number of cycles, number of landings). The prescribed actions restore the component utility margin to the applicable time limitation.
(2) On-Condition
It is a preventive process in which the component is inspected or tested, at specified periods, to an appropriate standard in order to determine whether it can continue in service. The purpose is to remove the component before its failure in service.
(3) Condition Monitoring
This is a process in which a parameter of a condition in a component (vibration, temperature, oil consumption, etc.) is monitored to identify the development of a fault. The purpose is to remove the component before its failure in service (e.g. due to related repair costs), but they are permitted to remain in service without preventive maintenance until a functional failure occurs.


Note: For components that are not subject to any of these primary maintenance processes, corrective maintenance is carried out after failure detection and is aimed at restoring components to a condition in which they can perform their intended function (‘fly-to failure’).


(d) The following table provides a summary of the records’ requirements related to components subjected to primary maintenance process, including components without an EASA Form 1 in accordance with 21.A.307 (c):

Primary maintenance processContinuing airworthiness records
Life-limited part— Current status (M.A.305(d)(1));
— In-service history record (M.A.305(e)(3)(i));
— EASA Form 1 and detailed maintenance records for last scheduled maintenance and subsequent unscheduled maintenance (M.A.305(e)(3)(ii)), including modifications and repairs (M.A.305(e)(2)(ii)).
Time-controlled componentHard time— Current status (M.A.305(d)(2));
— EASA Form 1 and detailed maintenance records for last scheduled maintenance and subsequent unscheduled maintenance (M.A.305(e)(3)(ii)), including modifications and repairs (M.A.305(e)(2)(ii)).
Time-controlled componentOn condition— Current status (M.A.305(d)(2)); and
— EASA Form 1 and detailed maintenance records for last scheduled maintenance and subsequent unscheduled maintenance (M.A.305(e)(3)(ii))
If the task is controlled at aircraft level, the above information could be already contained in the records related to the aircraft maintenance programme (M.A.305(c)(3) and M.A.305(e)(2)(iii)). If the maintenance was performed off wing, the EASA Form 1 needs to be kept.
Condition monitoringThe EASA Form 1 does not need to be kept unless this is the means to fulfil another requirement; for example, an AD compliance.
ELA 2 aircraft : any component that is fitted without an EASA Form 1 in accordance with 21.A.307 (c)The certificate of release to service and owner’s acceptance statement (M.A.305(e)(3)(iii)).

M.A.305(e) Record keeping

(e) The owner or operator shall establish a system to keep the following documents and data in a form acceptable to the competent authority and for the periods specified below:

1. aircraft technical log system: the technical log or other data equivalent in scope and detail, covering the 36 months period prior to the last entry,

AMC M.A.305(e)(1) Retention period

This retention period of 36 months could be extended in the case of an entry in the technical log system requiring an additional period of retention as defined in Part-M.

2. the CRS and detailed maintenance records:

(i) demonstrating compliance with ADs and measures mandated by the competent authority in immediate reaction to a safety problem applicable to the aircraft, engine(s), propeller(s) and components fitted thereto, as appropriate, until such time as the information contained therein is superseded by new information equivalent in scope and detail but covering a period not shorter than 36 months;
(ii) demonstrating compliance with the applicable data in accordance with point M.A.304 for current modifications and repairs to the aircraft, engine(s), propeller(s) and any component subject to airworthiness limitations; and
(iii) of all scheduled maintenance or other maintenance required for continuing airworthiness of aircraft, engine(s), propeller(s), as appropriate, until such time as the information contained therein is superseded by new information equivalent in scope and detail but covering a period not shorter than 36 months.

AMC M.A.305(e)(2) Modifications- repairs- ADs

(a) EASA Form 1 and the Certificate of Conformity of the components used to perform a modification/repair are not part of the substantiation data for a modification/repair. These certificates are retained by the maintenance organisation.

(b) In the case of an AD with several steps or with intermediate assessments during its application, these intermediate steps should be part of the detailed maintenance records.

GM M.A.305(e)(2) Retention period

‘Until such time as the information contained therein is superseded by new information equivalent in scope and detail but not shorter than 36 months’ means that during a maximum of 36 months the information and the one superseding it will be kept but, after these 36 months, only the new information must be kept.
For example, for a maintenance task with an interval shorter than 36 months, more than one set of information equivalent in scope and detail should be retained. If the maintenance task interval is longer than 36 months, the last set of information equivalent in scope and detail is retained.

3. data specific to certain components:

(i) an in-service history record for each life-limited part based on which the current status of compliance with airworthiness limitations is determined;
(ii) the CRS and detailed maintenance records for the last accomplishment of any scheduled maintenance and any subsequent unscheduled maintenance of all life-limited parts and time-controlled components until the scheduled maintenance has been superseded by another scheduled maintenance of equivalent scope and detail but covering a period not shorter than 36 months;
(iii) the CRS and owner’s acceptance statement for any component that is fitted to an ELA2 aircraft without an EASA Form 1 in accordance with point 21.A.307(b)(2) of Annex I (Part 21) to Regulation (EU) No 748/2012 but covering a period not shorter than 36 months.

AMC M.A.305(e)(3) EASA Form 1, supporting documents

(a) An EASA Form 1 and detailed maintenance records are not required to be kept to support every installation/removal shown in the in-service history records.

(b) Conservative methods to manage missing historical periods are acceptable to establish the current status of the life-limited part. In case of use of a conservative method, the supporting documents should be endorsed. Recommendations from the design approval holder on the procedures to record or reconstruct the in-service history should be considered.

GM M.A.305(e)(3) Components not requiring an EASA Form 1

(a) EASA Form 1 or equivalent is not required to be kept for the ‘condition monitoring’ process of components unless this is the means to fulfil another requirement quoted in M.A.305 (e.g. demonstration of AD compliance).

(b) For components that are not subject to any of the primary maintenance processes described in the GM M.A.305(d)(2) (i.e. Hard Time, On-Condition, Condition Monitoring), the EASA Form 1 or equivalent is not required to be kept.

4. Record-keeping periods when the aircraft is permanently withdrawn from service:

(i) the data required by point (b)(1) of point M.A.305 in respect of aircraft, engine(s), and propeller(s) which shall be retained for at least 12 months;
(ii) the last effective status and reports as identified under points (c) and (d) of point M.A.305 which shall be retained for at least 12 months; and
(iii) the most recent CRS(s) and detailed maintenance records as identified under points (e)(2)(ii) and (e)(3)(i) of point M.A.305 which shall be retained for at least 12 months.

AMC M.A.305(e) Information technology (IT) systems and form of records

(a) The information that constitutes the aircraft continuing airworthiness records may be entered in an information technology (IT) system and/or documents equivalent in scope and detail.
IT systems acceptable for supporting the aircraft continuing airworthiness records should:


(1) include functions so that search of data and production of status is possible;
(2) allow a transfer of the aircraft continuing airworthiness records data from one system to another using an industry-wide/worldwide data format or allow printing information;
(3) contain safeguards which prevent unauthorised personnel from altering data; and
(4) ensure the integrity of the data, including traceability of amendments.


(b) ‘Data equivalent in scope and detail’ are included in the airworthiness record system and could be an aircraft logbook, engine logbook(s) or engine module log cards, propeller logbook(s) and log cards for life-limited parts.
Any logbook/log card should contain:


(1) identification of the product or component it refers to;
(2) type, part number, serial number and registration, as appropriate, of the aircraft, engine, propeller, engine module, or component to which the component has been fitted in, along with the reference to the installation and removal;
(3) the date and the corresponding total in-service life accumulated in any applicable parameter unit, as appropriate; and
(4) any AD, modification, repair, maintenance or deferred maintenance tasks applicable.
When fulfilling the applicable requirements, a logbook/log card as described above could be a means to comply with the current status and the in-service history record for each life-limited part.


(c) Form of records
Producing and/or keeping continuing airworthiness records in a form acceptable to the competent authority normally means in either material/physical or electronic state, or a combination of both.
Retention of records should be done in one of the following formats:


(1) original paper document or electronic data (via an approved electronically signed form);
(2) a paper reproduction of a paper document (original or copy); or
(3) an electronic reproduction of electronic data (original or copy); or
(4) a printed reproduction of electronic data (original or copy); or
(5) an electronically digitised reproduction of a paper document (original or copy); or
(6) a microfilm or scanned reproduction copy of a paper document (original or copy).
Where IT systems are used to retain documents and data, it should be possible to print a paper version of the documents and data kept.


(d) Physical (non-digitised) records
All physical records should remain legible throughout the required retention period. Physical records on either paper or microfilm systems should use robust material, which can withstand normal handling, filing and ageing. They should be stored in a safe way with regard to damage, alteration and theft.


(e) Digitised records
Digitised records may be created from a paper document (original or copy) or from electronic data.
When created from a paper document:


(1) the creation date of the digitised record should be stored with the digitised record;
(2) it is advisable to create an individual digitised record for each document;

(3) if an organisation creates a large number of digitised records, the use of database technology should ease the future retrieval of the record; and
(4) digitised records should be legible, including details such as, but not limited to, the date of signature, names, stamps, notes, or drawings.


(f) Digitised record retention
Digitised records when created from an original paper record, or as a digital electronic original, should be stored on a system which is secured and kept in an environment protected from damage (e.g. fire, flooding, excessive temperature or accidental erasing). IT systems should have at least one backup system, which should be updated at least within 24 hours of any entry in the primary system. Access to both primary and backup systems is required to be protected against the ability of unauthorised personnel to alter the database and they should preferably be located remotely from the main system.
The system used for retention of digitised records should:


(1) ensure the integrity, accuracy and completeness of the record;
(2) ensure that access to the digitised record has safeguards against alteration of the data;
(3) ensure the authenticity of the record including assurance that the date has not been modified after creation;
(4) be capable of retrieving individual records within a reasonable time period; and
(5) be maintained against technological obsolescence which would prevent printing, displaying or retrieval of the digitised records.
Computer backup discs, tapes etc. should be stored in a different location from that containing the current working discs, tapes, etc. and in a safe environment.
Where the competent authority has accepted a system for digitised record-keeping satisfying the above, the paper document may be permanently disposed of.


(g) Lost or destroyed records
Reconstruction of lost or destroyed records can be done by reference to other records which reflect the time in service, research of records maintained by maintenance organisations and reference to records maintained by individual mechanics, etc. When reconstruction has been done and the record is still incomplete, the owner/operator may make a statement in the new record describing the loss and establishing the time in service based on the research and the best estimate of time in service. The reconstructed records should be submitted to the competent authority for acceptance. The competent authority may require the performance of additional maintenance if not satisfied with the reconstructed records.

M.A.305(f) Records availability

(f) The person or organisation responsible for the management of continuing airworthiness tasks pursuant to point M.A.201 shall comply with the requirements regarding the aircraft continuing airworthiness record system and present the records to the competent authority upon request.

AMC M.A.305(f) Retention responsibility, transfer of records

When the owner or organisation responsible for the aircraft continuing airworthiness arranges for the relevant maintenance organisation to retain copies of the continuing airworthiness records on their behalf, the owner or organisation responsible for the aircraft continuing airworthiness will continue to be responsible for the retention of records. If they cease to be the owner or organisation responsible for the aircraft continuing airworthiness of the aircraft, they also remain responsible for transferring the records to the new owner or organisation.

M.A.305(g) Continuing airworthiness record entries

(g) All entries made in the aircraft continuing airworthiness record system shall be clear and accurate. When it is necessary to correct an entry, the correction shall be made in a manner that clearly shows the original entry.

GM M.A.305 Continuing airworthiness record system

(a) The aircraft continuing airworthiness records are the means to assess the airworthiness status of a product and its components. An aircraft continuing airworthiness record system includes the processes to keep and manage those records and should be proportionate to the subject aircraft. Aircraft continuing airworthiness records should provide the owner/CAO/CAMO of an aircraft with the information needed:

(1) to demonstrate that the aircraft is in compliance with the applicable airworthiness requirements; and
(2) to schedule all future maintenance as required by the aircraft maintenance programme based, if any, on the last accomplishment of the specific maintenance as recorded in the aircraft continuing airworthiness records.


(b) ‘Applicable airworthiness limitation parameter’ and ‘applicable parameter’ refer to ‘flight hours’ and/or ‘flight cycles’ and/or ‘landings’ and/or ‘calendar time’, and/or any other applicable utilisation measurement unit, as appropriate.


(c) A ‘life-limited part’ is a part for which the maintenance schedule of the aircraft maintenance programme requires the permanent removal from service when, or before, the specified mandatory life limitation in accordance with Commission Regulation (EU) No 748/2012 if any of the applicable parameters is reached.


(d) The ‘current status’ when referring to components of life-limited parts should indicate, for each affected part, the life limitation, the total life accumulated in any applicable parameter (as appropriate) and the remaining life in any applicable parameter before the life limitation is reached.


(e) The term ‘time-controlled components’ embraces any component for which the maintenance schedule of the aircraft maintenance programme requires periodically the removal for maintenance to be performed in an appropriate approved organisation for maintenance in components (workshop) to return the component to a specified standard, the replacement of sub-components of the assembly by new ones, or the inspection or test of component’s performance, after a service period controlled at component level in accordance with the specified airworthiness limitation defined in accordance with Commission Regulation (EU) No 748/2012, in any of the applicable parameters.


(f) The ‘current status’ when referring to time controlled components refers to the current status of compliance with the required periodic maintenance task(s) from the maintenance schedule of the aircraft maintenance programme specific to the time-controlled components. It should include the life accumulated by the affected components in the applicable parameter, as appropriate, since the last accomplishment of scheduled maintenance specified in the maintenance schedule of the aircraft maintenance programme. Any action that alters the periodicity of the maintenance task(s) or changes the parameter of this periodicity should be recorded.


(g) ‘Detailed maintenance records’ in this part refers to those records required to be kept by the person or organisation responsible for the aircraft continuing airworthiness in accordance with M.A.201 in order that they may be able to fulfil their obligations under Part M.


These are only a part of the detailed maintenance records required to be kept by a maintenance organisation under M.A.614, CAO.A.090(a) or 145.A.55(c). Maintenance organisations are required to retain all detailed records to demonstrate that they worked in compliance with their respective requirements and quality procedures.
Not all records need to be transferred from the maintenance organisation to the person or organisation responsible for the aircraft continuing airworthiness in accordance with M.A.201 unless they specifically contain information relevant to aircraft configuration and future maintenance. Thus, incoming certificates of conformity, batch number references and individual task card sign-offs verified by and/or generated by the maintenance organisation are not required to be retained by the person or organisation responsible in accordance with M.A.201. However, dimensional information contained in the task card sign-off or work pack may be requested by the owner/CAO/CAMO in order to verify and demonstrate the effectiveness of the aircraft maintenance programme.


Information relevant to future maintenance may be contained in specific documents related to:
— modifications;
— airworthiness directives;
— repaired and non-repaired damage;
— components referred in M.A.305(d); and
— measurements relating to defects.


(h) An airworthiness limitation is a boundary beyond which an aircraft or a component thereof must not be operated, unless the instruction(s) associated with this airworthiness limitation is (are) complied with.


(i) ‘Other maintenance required for continuing airworthiness’ refers to unscheduled or out-of phase maintenance due to abnormal or particular conditions or events with an impact on the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft at the time of its return to service. It is not intended to request every single condition described in the maintenance data, e.g. Aircraft Maintenance Manual Chapter 5, but just those that cannot be captured by other means; for example, when they are not included in the records for repairs. Some abnormal or particular conditions or events that could be kept under this requirement could be lightning strikes, hard landings, longterm storage, propeller or rotor over-speed, over-torque, impact on a main rotor blade, etc.


(j) The term ‘in-service history record’ embraces records from which the current status of life-limited parts can be determined. The ‘in-service history record’ template could be adjusted to the relevant characteristics of the life-limited part, e.g. an engine disk being different from a fire extinguisher squib or landing gear sliding tube.


Such records document each time a life-limited part is placed in service or removed from service. They should clearly:
(1) identify the part by its part number and serial number,
(2) show the date of installation and removal (i.e. date on/date off),
(3) show the details of the installation and removal (i.e. type, serial number, weight variant, thrust rating, as appropriate, of the aircraft, engine, engine module, or propeller) at installation and removal of the part when this is necessary to appropriately control the life limitation.
(4) Show the total in-service life accumulated in any applicable parameter, as appropriate, corresponding to the dates of installation and removal of the part.


Any other events that would affect the life limitation, such as an embodied modification (in accordance with airworthiness directives, service bulletins or any product improvements) that affects the life limitation or changes the limitation parameter, should also be included in the in-service history record. Not all modifications would necessarily be pertinent to the life limitation of the component. Additionally, if a parameter is not relevant to the life of the part, then that parameter does not need to be recorded.


(k) The term ‘permanently withdrawn from service’ refers to moving the aircraft or component to a location that is not used for storage and/or future return to service.


(l) The term ‘current status’ refers to the data which accurately establishes the level of compliance of an aircraft, engine, propeller or component thereof, with a requirement. Each status should:


(1) identify the aircraft, the engine, the propeller or the component it applies to;
(2) be dated; and
(3) include the relevant total in-service life accumulated in the applicable parameter on the date of the status.

Updated on 16/06/2021

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